Web Publishing

As a member of the Columbia community, you can publish on the Web, and we encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity.

Regardless of what you publish—a personal website, a site for a course you're teaching, or a site for your group or department—please remember that you are responsible for what you publish. Before you begin, please read and understand the Columbia copyright policy.  Whatever your questions are about web publishing at Columbia, visiting the links in the boxes on the right side of this page should provide you with a great deal of information to help you get started.

Personal Websites

If you would like a personal website, you can create it in one of two ways:

  1. Set up your own personal blog (essentially a website with time-based content) at Columbia Blogs.
  2. If you're familiar with HTML and Javascript and would like to build your own site from scratch, you can set up a site in your space associated with your CUIT UNIX account.

Course Websites

If you are teaching a course, you have many options for your Web-based content:

  1. You may use CourseWorks to publish your syllabus, assign homework, invite online participation, and perform a variety of other functions.
  2. You may set up a course blog through EdBlogs.
  3. If you just need some basic server space, you can create an official website for your course.
  4. If you're looking for a place for collaborative editing of documents, take a look at Columbia Wikispaces.

For more information, please contact the Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning.

Departmental or Group Websites

If your group needs a website, you have several options available:

  1. You may request a group blog (essentially a website, with time-based content) on Columbia Blogs.
  2. If you need a custom design, along with assistance in setting up and maintaining your site, look no further than CUIT's Interactive Services team, which offers competitive, fee-based Web design, development and maintenance services to the entire University.
  3. If you are familiar with HTML and Javascript, or just need some Web space, you can request space.
  4. If you are interested in setting up a site for documentation, training materials, meeting notes, or related information, perhaps a wiki is the right tool for you. You may request a wiki at Columbia Wikis.

If you're not sure which of the above options is the right one for you, just email askcuit@columbia.edu and we will route your request appropriately.